Trends and strategies for wineries on Facebook

Trends and strategies for wineries on Facebook

Trends and strategies for wineries on Facebook

By now most of us are aware of the many benefits of embracing social media platforms like Facebook as part of a proactive marketing strategy, but here’s a brief recap.
Being involved in Facebook….
  Helps drive traffic to your website
  Allows you to join in conversations about your brand and can help you manage your brand’s reputation
•  Allows you to pick up on trends before they become mainstream – giving a head-start for innovation
  Can drive independent review and endorsement of your brand/product
  Can support and extend brand marketing activity such as sponsorships and events
•  Can lead to sales
Despite these benefits, consumers currently outnumber businesses on social media by 2:1 in Australia, and businesses appear to have stalled at about 33% being present in social media over the past two years (Sensis, May 2015).
Discouragingly, many Australian and New Zealand wineries who are making the effort to engage on Facebook are receiving mixed results. According to a recent report by Mastermind (May 2015), the majority of Australian and New Zealand wine brands have communities of less than 2000 fans, often resulting in a limited organic reach of posted messages (i.e., not boosted). It’s important to note here that size isn’t necessarily an indicator of success – many medium-sized brands with solid content plans in place are achieving greater traction than large businesses.
So what’s missing; why are some Australian and Kiwi wine brands struggling to reap the potential benefits offered by social media, and Facebook in particular?
Of those businesses who are engaging online, most are flying blind. A recent study by Sensis (May 2015) asserts, ‘quite a few businesses using social media still lack knowledge and direction about how to use it and its effectiveness for the business’:
  49% of SMEs and 45% of large businesses say they have invested money in social media but don’t know how much.
  Only 16% of SMEs and 29% of large businesses measure their return on investment in social media.
  37% of large businesses and 80% of SMEs have not developed a strategic plan for their social media.
Just like most plans, a masterful strategy for optimizing your Facebook presence begins with scratching out a list of priorities. Socialbakers (2015) suggest contemplating three priorities and their associated KPIs: generating brand awareness, advertising your product, and engaging directly with your community. A Proactive Strategy focuses on brand awareness and advertising, emphasizing fan growth, reach, and engagement. On the other hand, a Reactive Strategy values advertising and client care, measured by clicks and response rate/time. As you can imagine, a Balanced Strategy places an equal value on brand awareness, client care, and advertising.
Which strategy reflects your brand’s current goals, and are you making the most of your investments on Facebook?
If you require support with developing your Facebook strategy, contact me; Nicola McConnell nicola@brandamp.co.nz or 027 218 8120.